Category Archives: Startup Visa

Don’t make this mistake with Business and Startup Visas

cover photo for article about startup and business visa mistakes

Business and startup visas and international entrepreneurs are what and who I deal with on a daily basis. As someone who has embarked on the path of business visas as a foreign entrepreneur, I have learned a few lessons. Disclaimer: none of the content in this article, or website, constitute immigration advice in any shape or form. For professional immigration advice, please refer to a regulated immigration advisor or solicitor. If you are an international entrepreneur considering applying for a business or startup visa, there are quite a few things to consider. This may be one of the biggest challenges with foreign entrepreneurs. Starting a business is always hard work; add it to navigating immigration rules and you are bound to get things wrong.  As such, in this article, I seek to prevent foreign entrepreneurs from making ONE fatal mistake, and that is underestimating the requirements of business and startup visas.  Business & Startup visas may come with ongoing requirements Remember that under many visa paths such as the UK’s Innovator Founder Visa, there are ongoing milestones that founders must meet.  In other words, getting a business or startup visa is just the beginning.  Where do founders get it wrong? With the above in mind, founders usually underestimate startup and business visa requirements by either: These two mistakes can end up costing you money, time, energy and your health. It is vital that founders who consider startup and business visas are aware of this reality.  Startup and business visas are not the means to obtain long-term residency/citizenship.  It may be in certain countries, but it certainly is not the case with the UK’s Innovator Founder Visa.  Remember to assess everything from a “business” perspective, rather than a “residency/immigration” one.  What if residency is your goal? Entrepreneurship is not everyone’s forté, and I am not judging you for that.  Perhaps you do wish to invest in commercial projects whilst obtaining an additional residency or citizenship. In these cases, it is better to consider residency or citizenship by investment programs offered by several countries across the world.  Do not pursue a business or startup visa if your main priority is residency. Running a business has many uncertainties, and it should always be done for the purpose of generating profit unless we are speaking of non-profits.  Any other goal is foundationally wrong for doing so.  About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme. Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (replaced by the Innovator Founder Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses, and mainly with obtaining endorsements from the endorsing bodies.

5 elements of a good business plan

cover photo for article about the 5 elements of a good business plan

Writing a good business plan can be a challenging task. In essence, business planning is the first major challenge an entrepreneur faces as it is a blueprint of their venture. In this article, I will outline 5 elements that make a good business plan. This is based on my own experience as a tech founder, consultant and writer.  Writing a good business plan goes beyond proposing a viable business proposition. It entails clear articulation, milestones, well-written content and a thorough blueprint of how your business will succeed.  There are plenty of articles that will refer to the basic and compulsory parts of a business plan such as SWOT analysis and regard them as factors contributing to a good business plan.  However, my aim in this article is to provide you with the correct mindset and approach to: With the aforementioned in mind, let’s highlight the 5 key elements of a good business plan. Inclusion of the key standard sections  Okay, so let’s briefly highlight an obvious part, which many entrepreneurs surprisingly fall short of.  Regardless of the purpose of your business plan and where you are, several key sections must be included in every business plan. These key sections are: Clear & realistic business vision Entrepreneurship and starting a business require vision. And it is fantastic to set high goals. Nevertheless, this is where many entrepreneurs make a mistake. And the mistake is that they “fly too high” and set goals and visions that are essentially unrealistic.  Your vision and anticipated goals should be realistic and based on market trends supported by research.  Clear business milestones  The ideal business plan is not a fancy document to impress your investors or other parties. It is the blueprint of your business as a commercial entity.  And what does a blueprint entail? Clear procedural steps with timelines and outcomes.  Moreover, this is not just related to one part of the business plan, for example, product development.  Each aspect of the business (plan) should be subjected to prior anticipation with clear input/output estimations, whether it is product, marketing, sales or anything else.  Objective market research and avoiding the “founder bias” As stated earlier, I will not highlight standard business plan sections.  However, this part is crucial and you notice that I have used the word “objective”. You may have a business proposal that does respond to a genuine market need. However, this is where what I call the “founder bias” kicks in.  The “founder bias” is when a founder only states market research that supports the notion that there is a need for their product and/or service. This eliminates the “objectivity” aspect.  Your plan must be supported by objective market research, and this is why a business consultant like me is useful.  By highlighting all the facets of the market, you demonstrate enhanced commercial awareness. Plus, it enables you to anticipate and prepare for unexpected market shifts and how to respond accordingly.  Money, money, money (the financials) Regardless of the type of project, the primary goal of a venture is making money. Even if you are starting a non-profit/charity, your finances matter the most.  This is one of the most neglected aspects of many business plans. You must anticipate and account for cash inflows and outflows of your business.  And I get it: this is perhaps among the most difficult aspects, and hence why it is often neglected. However, without a financial analysis that is subject to scrutiny, you are almost always doomed for failure. About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs and all founders with their businesses, including their business plans.

Innovator Founder Visa: Business Consultant vs. Business Plan Writer

If you are considering the Innovator Founder visa, you have probably come across the terms “business plan writer” and “business consultant”. Well, at least on my website/channels you have. So let’s look at the difference between a business plan writer and a business consultant. Understanding the difference will also help you decide which one may be useful to you.  Depending on your venture and personal skills, you may need the help of a business plan writer or business consultant for your Innovator Founder visa application.  First of all, I will do the “sales” part to inform you that I am both a business plan writer and a business consultant. Nevertheless, this is not usually the case, distinguishing me from any other service pertaining to Innovator Founder visa and international founders. In fact, I am the UK’s first and #1 business consultant for international founders. Moreover, I was an immigrant entrepreneur myself and settled in the UK via several business visas.  Okay, now let’s look at each in detail, followed by a comparison table at the end.  Business Plan Writer In the abstract, the function of a plan writer is perhaps quite clear. Business plan writers possess the knowledge and skills to produce a well-written and well-researched business plan However, the key point is that a business plan writer may not necessarily be familiar with running a business or have prior experience of doing so.  The key competencies of a business plan writer are: Business Consultant  Business consultants, in contrast to business plan writers, are essentially there to advise on your business concept/protocols. Thus, they may not necessarily engage in producing business plans. However, they help you understand what needs to go on your business plan and eventually your venture.  The core competencies of a business consultant are: Summary Business Consultant Business Plan Writer In-depth industry knowledge  Understanding of business plan standards  Experience in running and scaling a business  Language/writing skills Need help? I operate as both a consultant and plan writer Whether you need help with writing your business consultant or are seeking a consultant to advise on your operations, I am here to help.  Get in touch with me today to find out more. You may also watch a YouTube video that I have made on the same topic.  About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats which I scaled to over 30 UK cities. I currently help other entrepreneurs and businesses of all size with the digital marketing strategy around SEO, copywriting and content.

Startup Visa Business Ideas: 3 Simple Steps to Get Started

cover photo for article about how to come up with startup visa business ideas written by Sohrab Vazir

Are you thinking about your next step and exploring startup visa business ideas? Every successful venture starts off with an idea. Thus, the right business idea is the seed of future success.  In this article, I want to help you get started with exploring startup visa business ideas. This article is essentially a “how to” guide for aspiring migrant founders.  Brief intro about me: I moved to the UK when I was 17 on a student visa. Following the completion of my master’s degree at Newcastle University, I founded my own startup.  My venture, StudyFlats, simplifies renting for students going abroad. It was built upon my own experience of being an international student in the UK. I scaled this business to over 30 UK cities and also obtained Settlement in the UK via the former Entrepreneur Visa scheme.  Therefore, I’ve been there! And in this guide, I will hopefully make your life easier as a founder. Believe it or not, exploring startup ideas mainly requires common sense. Some of the largest companies in the world such as Uber are built on relatively simple concepts. Here are the steps you should take to come up with startup visa business ideas: Find a personal “pain” point Ask yourself the following questions: Starting off with things that are personally inconvenient in your life is a great first step in exploring startup visa business ideas. What are you personally skilled at? What is your passion? Do you possess a specific skill set or competence in a specialist area? Moreover, this could also be a particular life experience (e.g. going abroad). As a matter of principle, it’s essential for a founder to know the associated industry of their prospective venture. Therefore, an area in which you are already competent is a great starting point.  For example: as an international student, I realised that there were no accommodation websites for overseas students. My proposed solution was a website that targeted international students before they moved to the UK.   The key point here is that I knew my industry / international students because I was one myself.  Startup visa business ideas relevant to the host market Finally, another important point to keep in mind is how relevant and applicable your idea is to the target destination.  In this step, ask yourself these questions: Hopefully, these tips will help you in your discovery of startup visa business ideas and ultimately pursue the right one. Need help? Get in touch with me today or click here to find out more about my Startup and Innovator visa business consultancy.  About My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats.I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme (similar to the current Start-Up Visa). Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (which was replaced by the Innovator Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses, and mainly with obtaining endorsements from the endorsing bodies.

Oops, this feature is disabled to protect against copyright infringement and enhance web security.