Tag Archives: Innovator Visa

Innovator Founder Visa: Pros & Cons

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The UK’s Innovator Founder visa was launched in 2023 as a pathway for foreign entrepreneurs to set up businesses in the UK. The visa and its requirements have substantially changed from its predecessor, the Innovator visa and the Tier 1 Entrepreneur scheme   If you are considering the UK’s Innovator Founder visa, then it is sensible to make a full evaluation. As a former migrant entrepreneur and business consultant working with people navigating the business immigration journey, I will seek to highlight the pros and cons of this visa.  Innovator Founder Visa Pros  Suitable for scalable businesses  The Innovator Founder visa requirements emphasize scalability. As such, if your business is scalable, or is already at traction stage, then this visa may be suitable.  Pathway to permanent residence & UK citizenship This visa offers two pathways for settlement (permanent residence) in the UK: three years or five years.   In comparison to other countries such as the UAE, this may be a desirable aspect for some.   The UK’s global position The UK is among the easiest countries in the world to start a business in.   Although due to recent legislation by the Companies House, there are now additional requirements and compliance protocols for setting up a company in the UK.   The multicultural landscape of the UK, as well as English being the spoken language may be an advantage to some international entrepreneurs.   Secondary employment The current Innovator Founder visa permits paid employment alongside the applicant’s business. This may be a beneficial option for some international founders. Innovator Founder Visa Cons  Strict business & endorsement requirements The selection process for the Innovator Founder visa which is through an endorsement from one of the four designated Endorsing Bodies is strict.   There are several requirements that your business must meet, as well as the founder/founding team meeting a certain skills level.   Less Endorsing Bodies There are now only 4 endorsing bodies in contrast to 65 under the previous Innovator visa pathway. This leaves applicants with less choice and a lower margin of error.   Personally, I support the view that a larger selection of Endorsing Bodies will facilitate additional sector-specific expertise.   May be expensive for some There are several costs involved, and these exclude any additional help from third parties such as a business consultant (me) or an immigration advisor/solicitor.   Minimum budget required: ÂŁ5000 to ÂŁ10,000 (this does not include the funds for your business). The initial costs are: Endorsement: ÂŁ1200 Visa Application Fee: ÂŁ1,191 (outside the UK) or ÂŁ1486 (inside the UK) NHS Health Surcharge: ÂŁÂŁ1,035 per year To help my clients/ Innovator Founder visa applicants, I offer an idea assessment service. This will involve assessing your idea and the provision of expert feedback to reduce the chances of your endorsement being rejected.   Economic uncertainty Global events such as the 2008 Financial Crisis, Brexit and COVID-19 have left a painful mark on the UK’s economy.   This is evident in several contexts such as the Cost-of-Living Crisis.  Additionally, with the 2025 General Election coming up, it is reasonable to expect dramatic policy shifts, indicating economic uncertainty. These are some of the pros and cons of the Innovator Founder visa. Need help with the Innovator Founder visa endorsement? Check out my services, designed specifically for founders like you. About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme. Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (replaced by the Innovator Founder Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses. Disclaimer: none of the content in this article or my services constitutes immigration advice or services.

Innovator Founder Visa Rejection | 4 reasons

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The risk of an Innovator Founder visa rejection is on the rise. This is not a surprise as the new visa, in contrast to the former Innovator visa, now permits applicants to engage in paid employment. As such, this has led to increased interest and demand for the Innovator Founder visa.  Disclaimer: none of the content in this article or my services constitutes immigration advice or services. In addition to increased demand, the current Innovator Founder visa can only be endorsed by 4 Endorsing Bodies, a far smaller number than the previous visa. As a business consultant working with international entrepreneurs, I have come across Innovator Founder visa rejection cases that relate to the endorsement stage. Moreover, I have also actively monitored the Innovator Founder visa’s rejections. These are 3 common reasons why your Innovator Founder visa endorsement application may be rejected.  1. Your idea is not innovative   As you may be aware, there are 3 key factors that Endorsing Bodies assess when considering endorsement applications, which are: Let’s talk about the innovation aspect first. Technically speaking, your idea/business should: 2. Your business is not viable  Notice that I did not use the word “idea” in the heading above?  The “viability” aspect refers to “you”, the founder/founding team. The core requirement is whether you have the skills and competencies to start and scale the business or not. Thus, factors such as your professional experience or qualifications will be relevant.  3. Your idea is not scalable Put simply: what is the vision for your business? How far will it go? How much money will it make? You may have a unique concept and have the personal skills to launch the business, but how big will the business get? If your business cannot scale nationally or internationally, it may be one of the reasons for a rejection of your Innovator Founder visa endorsement. 4. You bought a bad Innovator Founder visa business plan  I write business plans for my clients (up to a limit, as they take a lot of time and I write each plan myself). Therefore, I am aware that many founders will seek the help of external parties for their business plan. Sadly, the market is now full of business plan writers who simply either use ChatGPT, or hire people with no experience in business to write a low-quality plan.  This is why I have introduced a service to coach and mentor founder to writer their own business plan. I understand that for some, it may be necessary to have somebody else communicate their business.  However, writing your own business plan will give you more confidence in presenting it, and it will also improve several skills such as writing and design. And do not worry, I will help you with ALL of that.  These are some common reasons behind an Innovator Founder Visa rejection at the endorsement stage. Remember, do not trust every company or person to be in charge of your business ideas and endorsement application, unless you can verify their credentials. Even then, you should make sure that you are aware of every aspect and stage of the business plan whilst it is written.  Need help with the Innovator Founder visa endorsement? Check out my services, designed specifically for founders like you. About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme. Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (replaced by the Innovator Founder Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses.

What you should NOT do when writing an Innovator Founder visa business plan

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Writing an Innovator Founder visa business plan can be challenging. That’s one of the reasons why many international founders opt to work with me on their Innovator Founder visa business plan.  This article solely represents a case of personal evaluation and opinion. It shall by no means constitute immigration and/or professional advice. If you plan to apply for the Innovator Founder visa, you must prepare a business plan. I have previously written an article about how to create an Innovator Founder visa business plan. In this article, I want to share some tips on writing an Innovator Founder visa business plan. Specifically, I will be highlighting things that you should NOT do when you are planning your venture.  Remember: the perfect business plan does not boil down to being well-written or well-designed (although these are also essential). Writing the ideal Innovator Founder visa business plan requires a well-thought, viable and clear business proposition.  These tips will help you in formulating both your business plan, as well as some of the fundamental aspects of your business planning.  Overpromise  This is one of the biggest mistakes made by founders. Sadly, international entrepreneurs are not exempt either.  And it’s easy to understand why: you want to present the “ideal” image for your concept, whether it’s to the Innovator Founder Endorsing Bodies, the Home Office or even investors. However, this is a dangerous mistake, especially if you are held accountable for making progress against your initial Innovator Founder visa business plan.  Underestimate your competition & market dynamics In line with the last point, some founders also underestimate their market and competition.  This may be done either intentionally, to present an inaccurate/idealistic image of the market, or unintentionally as a result of personal neglect.  Overestimate your offer This is an advice that you may not get from many consultants.  Remember: simplicity is key. Keep everything as simple and straightforward as possible. Don’t write pages and pages about why your product is ideal and what it does. Instead, dedicate your content to presenting evidence of your venture and the market’s viability.  Neglect the financials  Cash flow and financial management are integral to every business. You must plan for and state all instances of incoming and outgoing cash flow.  Have a plan B for every scenario and determine the financial implications of all scenarios.  Need help with writing your Innovator Founder visa business plan? Read about my full services here to find out more.  About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme. Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (replaced by the Innovator Founder Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses.

Is the “innovation” requirement of the Innovator Founder visa flawed? | Policy Analysis

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This article solely represents a case of personal evaluation and opinion. It shall by no means constitute immigration and/or professional advice. Policymakers are particularly invited to engage with this content and communicate their views accordingly.  The innovation factor is a core and integral element of the Innovator Founder visa policy. However, is this requirement flawed? In this article, I will highlight the potential drawbacks and flaws of the innovation requirement.  Unlike the former UK business visa schemes such as the Tier 1 Entrepreneur scheme, the Innovator Founder visa policy has emphasised innovation as a key element. On the surface, this may appear to be an appropriate shift in the interest of attracting high-quality businesses and entrepreneurs to the UK. However, a closer examination reveals certain flaws.  What is the innovation requirement under the Innovator Founder visa? Per the Innovator Founder visa policy, innovation is a key benchmark for applicant assessment and determining their suitability.  Each applicant’s business (idea) must satisfy the following three criteria: The wording of the Home Office defines innovation as the following: “The applicant must have a genuine, original business plan that meets new or existing market needs and/or creates a competitive advantage” This wording is referencing the Home Office’s policy guidance for its staff, dated 7th December 2023.  Innovation: a sound requirement in theory  Now, it is important to note that the innovation requirement is not theoretically incorrect or inappropriate.  It is my view that any nation should be able to determine its rules for immigration pathways.  Furthermore, the innovation requirement ensures the quality of applicants and their ventures under the Innovator Founder visa.  Therefore, I believe that the requirement in itself may be valuable in principle. However, similar to many other policies, there is a distinction between “theoretically valuable” and “practical”. Innovation: problem in practice? Now that we have established that the innovation factor is logical on a theoretical basis, let’s look at it in practice.  The innovation’s foundation is, theoretically, based on the following: Interpretation of innovation  The first issue with the innovation requirement is the Home Office’s wording in its definition of it.  By the usage of “new” or “existing” (with emphasis on “or”), it is feasible to argue that innovation can apply to businesses that target an existing market, hence the emphasis on the creation of competitive advantage.  However, this raises a further issue. What is interpreted as “competitive advantage” in the case of an “existing” market? The issue with this policy is a generalistic use of the term “competitive advantage” without outlining what it entails in detail.  And the world of entrepreneurship is full of important details.  Ultimately, we notice that this is interpreted by each endorsing body through its assessment protocols.  For instance, I have come to notice that one of these endorsing bodies referred to intellectual property (IP) protection as a determining factor (names not disclosed for anonymity) However, again, this means that there is a lack of consensus, thorough definition and clear measurement metrics as to how “competitive advantage” over an “existing” market vs. a “new market” is defined. The importance of policy wording You may assume that I am reading too far into these terms. However, any legitimate policymaker must understand the considerable implications of how policies are worded. In the case of the Innovator Founder visa, we are talking about 1000s of applicants.  I am not a policymaker nor a legal professional, despite holding a master’s degree in international law. In case you are interested, you may see my resume for more information.  However, allow me to tell you this based on my law postgraduate thesis that the wording of international legislation such as the United Nations Security Council, and specifically Article 51 of the UN Charter, governs how international warfares are determined as legal or in violation of international law. The mere usage of the conjunction of “or” in this article has been crucial in the assessment of several international and domestic conflicts. Thus, with the above as an example, a sound policy evaluation must outline the potential practical flaws of policies, as is the aim of this article.  The first issue is the Home Office’s lack of clarity in its definition of innovation, especially concerning new versus existing markets which are inherently different from each other. Many ideas face current market players The nature of business in our modern world reflects growing technological advancements. The Internet alone, and the online nature of commerce, have radically shifted the nature of enterprise solutions.  With the aforementioned, there is the consequence of increased competition in virtually any field.  The latter alone also reflects the lesser barriers to entry to the market, for instance, due to the Internet. This is also reflected in the case of businesses that apply for the Innovator Founder visa. It is a reality that most ideas will have to fall under the “existing market” definition.  Innovation = IP? The preceding points raise the question of whether intellectual property protection is the ultimate defining factor.  And as a business professional, I am bound to agree that this would be the most reasonable view. At least that is my interpretation of it. Additionally, an Innovator Founder visa endorsing body has made particular reference to intellectual property protection. Therefore,  we may reasonably assume the priority importance of this factor. This again, reflects the lack of any clarity from the Home Office on interpreting competitive advantage. Nevertheless, we will adopt the view that IP protection would be a key factor in assessing innovation.  And by IP protection, we are mainly referring to patents, as many can simply file for a trade mark.  However, patents can take years to be granted, especially if there is a dispute. In this case, we are assuming that the applicant does have sufficient personal network and resources to embark on such a life. By this, we can see that such immigration restrictions deter and discourage high-net-worth individuals who are facing major challenges with their ventures. They would certainly not want to…

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Innovator Founder Visa | Policy Analysis

Just over a month ago, I created a YouTube video exploring the policy flaws of the UK’s Innovator Founder visa. This article is essentially a reflection of the same video, highlighting three fundamental policy flaws surrounding the Innovator Founder visa requirements.  *Please note that this content is merely a reflection of my personal opinion and evaluation and does not constitute immigration advice in any shape or form. If you are seeking immigration advice, please refer to OISC to find a registered immigration advisor/solicitor.* According to the UK Government’s website, the Innovator Founder visa allows international entrepreneurs to set up businesses in the UK. Full details of the visa rules can be found HERE.  The purpose of this article, however, is not to outline the general information about this visa. I have written this blog post to: –Highlight the flaws that other founders may resonate with; –To draw the attention of policymakers towards the anticipated flaws of the Innovator Founder visa and how it may potentially harm the UK in the short and long term So, let’s explore the flaws of the Innovator Founder visa policy. The low number of Innovator Founder visa endorsing bodies  This is perhaps the major weakness of the Innovator Founder visa policy.  This is especially the case when one takes a comparative evaluation between this visa path and its predecessor, the Innovator visa.  There are currently 3 endorsing bodies overseeing all applications made under the Innovator Founder visa pathway. This excludes the Global Entrepreneurs Programme (GEP) which is administered by the Department for Business and Trade. The aforementioned is in contrast to over 20 endorsing bodies that had the authority to issue endorsements for the former Innovator visa. Moreover, the previous endorsing bodies included well-established and reputable accelerators such as Founders Factory. To summarise the key issues in relation to the number of endorsing bodies: High endorsement & visa fees  Another major issue which may discourage many prospective applicants is the high visa fees associated with this visa pathway.  Let’s look at the initial costs associated with the Innovator Founder visa (and these are for single applicants only): As you see, you are paying a minimum of ÂŁ3000 to simply make an application under this visa pathway.  By setting such high fees, the UK Government has failed to consider the long-term economic contribution of international entrepreneurs to the UK.  Not applicable to all The Innovator Founder visa is likely to not be applicable to every single founder. And the manner in which this is evident is through the three key business idea requirements, which are: Whilst on the surface, the abovestated factors may seem appropriate, they are not practical in action.  For instance, the viability requirement may only be evident once a business actually begins trading. Yet, this visa is also aimed at entrepreneurs who wish to “set up” their business in the UK. Another instance where the lack of applicability of this visa path is reflected is the removal of the former Startup and Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur visas. These visa routes were specifically aimed at founders who were to set up their business in the UK. Personally, I underwent the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur route myself under the endorsement of Newcastle University.  Currently, the Innovator Founder visa is a mashup of all founders, from all backgrounds and regardless of their business nature/stage.  Final notes  Entrepreneurship is fundamentally unpredictable and involves a core element of risk. Combining this with stringent and unfeasible immigration requirements does not provide an optimal outcome for any stakeholder. Moreover, it will only serve to weaken the UK’s global position as an entrepreneurial hub.  I appreciate that policymakers ought to ensure that genuine and innovative migrants move to the UK. Nevertheless, policies should be drafted in such a manner that involves a thorough comprehension of entrepreneurship and also mitigates the risk between the government and international entrepreneurs.  Need help with the Innovator Founder visa? I am the UK’s #1 & leading business consultant for international entrepreneurs. Whilst I do not provide immigration advice, I am able to assist in multiple areas such as drafting your Innovator Founder visa business plan.  For a full overview of my services, please refer to my homepage here.  About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme (similar to the current Start-Up Visa). Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (replaced by the Innovator Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses, and mainly with obtaining endorsements from the endorsing bodies.

Innovator Founder Visa: Business Consultant vs. Business Plan Writer

If you are considering the Innovator Founder visa, you have probably come across the terms “business plan writer” and “business consultant”. Well, at least on my website/channels you have. So let’s look at the difference between a business plan writer and a business consultant. Understanding the difference will also help you decide which one may be useful to you.  Depending on your venture and personal skills, you may need the help of a business plan writer or business consultant for your Innovator Founder visa application.  First of all, I will do the “sales” part to inform you that I am both a business plan writer and a business consultant. Nevertheless, this is not usually the case, distinguishing me from any other service pertaining to Innovator Founder visa and international founders. In fact, I am the UK’s first and #1 business consultant for international founders. Moreover, I was an immigrant entrepreneur myself and settled in the UK via several business visas.  Okay, now let’s look at each in detail, followed by a comparison table at the end.  Business Plan Writer In the abstract, the function of a plan writer is perhaps quite clear. Business plan writers possess the knowledge and skills to produce a well-written and well-researched business plan However, the key point is that a business plan writer may not necessarily be familiar with running a business or have prior experience of doing so.  The key competencies of a business plan writer are: Business Consultant  Business consultants, in contrast to business plan writers, are essentially there to advise on your business concept/protocols. Thus, they may not necessarily engage in producing business plans. However, they help you understand what needs to go on your business plan and eventually your venture.  The core competencies of a business consultant are: Summary Business Consultant Business Plan Writer In-depth industry knowledge  Understanding of business plan standards  Experience in running and scaling a business  Language/writing skills Need help? I operate as both a consultant and plan writer Whether you need help with writing your business consultant or are seeking a consultant to advise on your operations, I am here to help.  Get in touch with me today to find out more. You may also watch a YouTube video that I have made on the same topic.  About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats which I scaled to over 30 UK cities. I currently help other entrepreneurs and businesses of all size with the digital marketing strategy around SEO, copywriting and content.

Approaching an Innovator Founder Visa Endorsing Body: 3 things to consider

*Disclaimer: None of the content in this article, or this website, constitutes any form of immigration advice whatsoever. The material in relation to immigration on this website is solely “signposting” and readers are encouraged to seek advice from a qualified advisor using the OISC’s website. Any opinions expressed on this website are those of the author and of a business nature, nor do they constitute any form of advice.* Starting a business in the UK requires an endorsement from an Innovator Founder Visa Endorsing Body. These are organisations that are approved by the Home Office to issue endorsements to selected international entrepreneurs.  According to the UK Government’s website, there are currently 3 Innovator Founder visa Endorsing Bodies, which you can find HERE. Regardless of your immigration status/nationality, the process of approaching an Innovator Founder visa Endorsing Eody does have a business/commercial element. For instance, your business plan and how well you articulate your idea are integral to the endorsement outcome.  In this article, I seek to highlight 3 points that may be beneficial in choosing an Endorsing Body. This is best for your business proposition (e.g. their past portfolio and expertise in your sector). Thus, these factors are the “business/commercial” ones rather than being associated with the visa application.  Communication This is a significant factor in any form of relationship, whether personal or professional.  Moreover, you will have to work with the Innovator Founder visa Endorsing Body that you choose for the duration of your visa. Hence, it’s important to ensure there is sufficient communication that you feel comfortable with as an entrepreneur.  Pay attention to how you and the Endorsing Body communicate in the initial stage. Communication is always a reliable indicator. Communication is also evident in an organisation’s clarity about their procedures. Startup portfolio of the Endorsing Body Another helpful factor in choosing an Endorsing Body, or even another stakeholder such as an accelerator in the next stages, is looking at the past companies under their support.  One that may be decisive is industry knowledge. For instance, you have a business proposition in the Blockchain sector and the Endorsing Body has previously supported founders in the same industry. Additional support offered by the Innovator Founder Visa endorsing body Each founder has their own unique circumstances. Therefore, it is a good idea to find out whether the Endorsing Body that you are targeting offers any form of additional support.  However, as stated, this may not be applicable to every founder.  About My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats.I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme (similar to the current Start-Up Visa). Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (which was replaced by the Innovator Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses, and mainly with obtaining endorsements from the endorsing bodies.

Immigration Business Plans: 3 things to keep in mind

Preparing an immigration business plan can be a tedious and stressful task. There are many things to consider when starting a business, and each must be reflected in the business plan. This is not exclusive to immigration business plans, but any form of business plan. Moreover, preparing an immigration business plan is separate from being a competent entrepreneur. This is precisely where a business consultant such as myself comes in. In this article, I aim to highlight 3 things to prioritise when preparing an immigration business plan. These are applicable irrespective of whether you writing the plan yourself or working with a consultant/business plan writer. So before discussing the key points, let’s evaluate why writing an immigration business plan can get tricky. As I said earlier, you may be a skilled entrepreneur and have a viable business proposition. However, the issue can sometimes be in communicating that proposition in the best way possible. For example, a business plan may be far better when written with native-level fluency and using visual elements.  The many factors that are inherent to a business plan require clear articulation above all. Let’s face it: First impressions are instrumental in outcomes. And your business plan is the opportunity to make that first “professional” impression.  With this in mind, now let’s take a look at 3 key things to consider when preparing a business plan. 1. Problem & Solution  Problem & solution are the key introductory elements of your business plan. Moreover, they also include an overview of what your product or service is.  Ensure to clearly emphasise the following: It is important to be thorough yet clear with this part. By “clear” I am referring to simple, graspable and non-technical language.  In summary, focus on clearly communicating the problem you solve and how you do so. 2. Numbers, numbers, numbers….. Please take this lesson from me as an entrepreneur who has been on both sides of the spectrum: “Cash is king”.  Cash flow is the bloodline of every business. Unless you are a charity, non-profit or similar organisation, your goal is to make money.  Interestingly, many founders over-focus on other aspects such as their product instead of prioritising how they will manage their company’s cash flow and revenue stream. To keep it short: 3. Use visual elements in an immigration business plan Nobody wants to read large chunks of paragraphs in a 20-50 page-long document. Utilise the power of visual elements to create an engaging immigration business plan. These can include charts, bars, graphs and much more.  These are 3 things to keep in mind when preparing an immigration business plan. If you need assistance with writing yours, get in touch with me today.  About My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats.I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme (similar to the current Start-Up Visa). Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (which was replaced by the Innovator Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses, and mainly with obtaining endorsements from the endorsing bodies.

How To Create an Innovator Founder Visa Business Plan?

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If you’re considering the UK’s Innovator Founder Visa, then one of your key questions is probably “how to create an Innovator Founder Visa business plan?” *Disclaimer: please note that I am not an immigration adviser, nor do I offer any immigration advice. My services are purely of a business nature, and I solely help with making a successful application to endorsing bodies. Rightly so, one of your key concerns should be how to create an Innovator Founder Visa business plan. In this article, I will briefly highlight 3 steps that you should take in order to create an Innovator Founder Visa business plan.  However, it’s perhaps more accurate to state that these steps will provide the “groundwork” guide for how to create an Innovator Founder Visa business plan.  Seek expert opinion Regardless of how much of a seasoned entrepreneur you may be, it’s important to get another perspective.  The Innovator Visa route is expensive and you have to invest plenty of time into it. Thus, it’s key to get it right from the start.  In this sense, I am the expert that you can speak to (more about me HERE).  Determine the viability & innovative aspect of your concept Before taking any other steps, it’s imperative to ensure your idea is both viable and innovative. Here are a few questions/pointers to help you get started: Of course, these are only a small point but they will help to place you in the right path.  Research the Innovator Founder Visa Endorsing Bodies  Generally business plans follow a standard structure, with certain differences depending on the business and its industry.  One of the most helpful things you can do is to get to know the endorsing bodies. Subsequently, it’s key to understand the endorsing body or bodies that you wish to target.  In doing so, pay attention to the following: Hopefully these tips should help you get an idea about how to create an Innovator Founder Visa business plan…..Need help? Get in touch with me today for an informal consultation to discuss your business proposition. As a former veteran of the business immigration path, I am best equipped to help you create a solid Innovator Founder Visa business plan. About My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats.I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme (similar to the current Start-Up Visa). Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur visa (which was replaced by the Innovator visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses, and mainly with obtaining endorsements from the endorsing bodies. Helpful Resources Immigration business plans: 3 things to keep in mind

3 Things to Consider Before Applying For the Innovator Founder Visa

Cover photo for article by Sohrab Vazir about 3 things to consider before applying for Startup and Innovator Visas

Applying for the Innovator Founder visa requires thought and careful planning. Not only do you have to make your business a success, but you also have to adjust to living in a new country.  None of the content in this article or website shall constitute immigration advice in any shape or form. For immigration queries, please refer to a regulated solicitor or an immigration advisor regulated by the OISC. Here are 3 things that you should keep in mind if you’re considering to apply for the UK’s Innovator Founder visa. Living expenses Aside from your business, you need to account for your living costs. Whilst this may seem obvious, the key point is long-term planning. You need to plan for several scenarios, several of which include: Planning carefully for this is essential and ensures there are no nasty surprises later on. Application, immigration & visa costs Aside from your business and personal expenses, there are other costs too. You must find out whether your endorsing body will charge you and if yes, how much.  Depending on your circumstances, these costs can vary.  Linguistic & cultural differences Again, this also depends on your circumstances. For some, this may not be an issue in the slightest. However, it may take time to get accustomed to cultural differences and different business practices.  Therefore, it’s a good idea to learn about the UK’s business culture and everyday life if you’re unfamiliar.  These are three obvious, yet underestimated, things to consider before applying for the Innovator Founder visa.  If you need business assistance for your idea/company before applying for the Innovator Founder visa, then get in touch with me today or visit my page to find out more. About My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats.I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme (similar to the current Start-Up Visa). Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (which was replaced by the Innovator Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses, and mainly with obtaining endorsements from the endorsing bodies.

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