Tag Archives: Migration

Why every international entrepreneur should work with a business consultant?

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You are an international entrepreneur and want to start a business abroad. You may dread the various legal, commercial and perhaps cultural challenges ahead of you. Obtaining a visa, albeit a significant milestone, is only your first hurdle. I know how this situation feels as I have been in your shoes.  I became an international entrepreneur in the UK following the competition of my master’s degree at Newcastle University. At the time, I identified a gap in the student housing market, which resulted in conceptualising and founding my former venture, StudyFlats.  Within 4 years, I grew StudyFlats to 30+ UK cities, a team of four and we almost closed our first funding round until the lovely events of 2020 squashed the entire company (yes, painful). Nevertheless, I still obtained my Settlement/Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK, also known as permanent residency. Throughout this entire time, I was fortunate to have friends and a powerful network to help me overcome some of the challenges facing every international entrepreneur. This was especially the case as I started StudyFlats with less than £500 and proofread students’ assignments in the first year to support myself and my business.  However, not every international entrepreneur may have the network that I had. Moreover, I still had to make a lot of mistakes and go through extreme financial and mental pressure to grow my business. Yet, I could not identify a business consultant who specialised in working with overseas entrepreneurs (and decided to be the first one myself by the end of 2022). Let me tell you a little truth: as an international entrepreneur, you are at a disadvantage. You are taking risks and are also investing your key resources, time and money. If it fails, you are the only one losing.  Risk is a core part of entrepreneurship, regardless of what type of entrepreneur you are. However, the risk is even greater when you are an entrepreneur and also have to comply with immigration rules and milestones.  And this is one of the reasons why every international entrepreneur should work with a business consultant.  Working with a consultant such as myself will help you in the following ways: Minimising risk  My first advice to any entrepreneur is to have a thorough understanding of the market in which they seek to operate.  This requires: Many international entrepreneurs lack one or both of the above, and it often results in disaster.  The right business consultant will help you minimise risk as they possess both of the above factors.  Cultural gap  In life, and especially in business, everything boils down to relationships.  You may neglect this factor. However, if you fail to communicate with your stakeholders the right way, you are destined to fail.  The way business is conducted differs in each country. You may be a skilled entrepreneur, yet lack the cultural grasp of doing business in a country other than yours. Business consultants who work with international entrepreneurs (at least the right ones) will comprehend the importance of this point. Additionally, they will be able to help you successfully navigate the cultural landscape.  Commercial expertise  Entrepreneurship is a game of unlimited challenges. You fix one aspect, and the other crumbles. This is a brutal reality that you must accept.  Additionally, various considerations must be taken into account. Let’s look at a few: By working with a business consultant, you will delegate some of these to them. This is not only sensible from a business perspective, but also essential for you to be able to overcome the personal and professional challenges that you will have to face.  These are some of the reasons why every international entrepreneur should work with a business consultant.  If you are an international entrepreneur and want to work with a consultant, get in touch with me today. I am the UK’s first and #1 independent business consultant who has been through the immigration journey himself.  About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme. Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (replaced by the Innovator Founder Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses.

What moving abroad alone as a 17-year-old immigrant taught me

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I will always consider myself an “immigrant”, partly because I refuse any negative connotation in relation to this term; I was born and raised in Iran. At the age of 17, I packed my entire life and got on a plane to the UK in pursuit of further education, all alone.  Well, every story starts somewhere, and my immigration story began shortly after I finished High School in Iran. Initially, I moved to Manchester on a student visa to attend college/pre-university preparation. My educational journey came to an end when I was 22 and obtained my master’s degree in law from Newcastle University.  Shortly after, I developed a business idea based on my experience with renting accommodation as an international student, which later became StudyFlats. This idea was supported by Newcastle University and got me a 1-year visa as a graduate international entrepreneur.  Subsequently, I obtained a three-year visa (which led to my settlement after it ended). During this period, I scaled StudyFlats to over 30 UK cities, hired a team of four and managed a global client base across property sites around the UK.  Going through the business immigration journey was one of the most difficult journeys that I could embark on. It profoundly changed my worldview, self-perspective and professional skill set.  There are some big lessons that I learnt along the way. My hope is for these to resonate with others experiencing the same hardships or learning curve, and to raise awareness of the immigration narrative from an entrepreneurial and personal perspective.  You are at a disadvantage, in many things… Yes, this is a fact, nor is this some “woke/snowflake” rant. Racism, discrimination and prejudice exist in the UK. They can be witnessed within many fabrics of the society, such as: -Housing -Employment  -Healthcare  -Media  Of course, each person’s experience is unique. One individual may only encounter discrimination and racism in one area but not necessarily in another.  The argument is that discrimination exists and it can become a professional and personal barrier. Personally, I may have been lucky or privileged to not experience many of these. However, the journey of being an immigrant certainly taught me about what discrimination looks like. You think more about the world  One side effect of a multinational and global personal perspective is that it forces you to think more.  You compare different nations and question how and why they come to differ. This will lead to even more questions.  How did they come to differ? What differentiates the two societies and the way they are administered?  These are examples of questions that you may have, and it’s a good thing.  These questions, and comparative outlook, will contribute to your growth and level of knowledge.  The question of “identity” This is perhaps one of the most challenging aspects of being an immigrant, or you could also say a “global citizen”.  Once you spend long enough in another country/ your new “home”, you will undergo a series of changes.  After a while, it just seems like you don’t fully belong anywhere. Your identity is now a reflection of different, and sometimes contrasting, viewpoints.  Whilst inconvenient, such experiences will either make or break you.  These are some of the things that I learnt as an immigrant who moved to the UK alone at the age of 17…Now I help other aspiring global citizens start their businesses abroad. About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats which I scaled to over 30 UK cities. I currently help other entrepreneurs and businesses of all size across several domains. For my credentials, please see here.

The general costs of running a limited company in the UK

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If you want to start a business in the UK, one of the most common ways is through incorporating a limited company.  There are various business structures in the UK that one may start a business through. The most common ways are: It is ultimately up to you to decide which structure fits you best. Each has its own tax implications and regulatory requirements.  However, assuming that you wish to start a limited company in the UK, below are some of the costs that you will incur. Accounting  Limited companies require the director(s) to submit annual accounts. Preparing and filing a limited company’s accounts, in most cases, will require an accountant’s assistance.  The costs of an accountant can vary based on:  Generally, you can expect to pay your accountant anywhere between £500-£2000 per year.  These are broad estimates, and you may even have to pay more in certain circumstances.  Registered address UK limited companies require a registered address. If you have an office, then that address will suffice.  However, if you do not have an office, there are two options: Confirmation statement Limited companies are required to file a Confirmation Statement every year, which costs £13.  On many occasions, this fee will be covered by your accountant as part of their services. Company incorporation Depending on how you incorporate your company, there is an incorporation fee.  The cost can range from £10 to £40. Corporation tax This will depend on whether your UK limited company makes a profit.  Currently, the UK’s corporation tax rate is per below: 19% : for limited companies with profits between 0-£50,000  25%: for limited companies with profits above £250,000  For full information, please refer to the UK Government’s website. These are some of the general costs of running a UK limited company.  If you are planning to start a business in the UK and need help, get in touch with me to start your journey today. About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats which I scaled to over 30 UK cities. I currently help other entrepreneurs and businesses of all size across several domains. For my credentials, please see here.

How to come up with an Innovator Founder visa business idea

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One of the questions that I keep getting from inquiries is “How do I come up with an Innovator Founder visa business idea?”Therefore, writing an article on this subject may be useful for many of you who are interested in this path. Disclaimer: none of the content in this article, or website, constitute immigration advice in any shape or form. For professional immigration advice, please refer to a regulated immigration advisor or solicitor. First and foremost, it is important to note that the current immigration rules on the Innovator Founder visa require the applicant to have come up with the business idea themselves. This is reflected in page 4 of the case worker guide for the Innovator Founder visa by the Home Office.  Therefore, it is important to note neither I nor any other compliant individual and/or entity shall provide you with a business idea. Any party that does so will be violating the immigration rules. Thus, be wary of any person or company that offers a “business idea for sale”.  However, if you do have a business idea, I am certainly able to help you with identifying the strengths and weaknesses of that idea. As the UK’s number one business consultant for corporate immigration, I possess the knowledge and experience that will enable me to swiftly identify the key flaws of your business proposal.  In this article, I will provide brief guidance via several starting points that will help you come up with a business idea. Therefore, this is a short “manual” and “how to guide” for coming up with any (practical) business idea, irrespective of the objective.  Start with a problem (statement) The majority (not all) of successful business ideas are based on problem-solving. Some may not necessarily solve a problem but rather improve how a problem is solved.   Hence, your starting point can be the creation of a problem statement sheet.  Get your pen and paper out (or open a Word document) and start brainstorming. Think of the following: Research the market  Once you have identified an (unsolved) problem, your next step is to engage in market research. In the case of an Innovator Founder visa business idea, this will be the UK market.  This will most likely be a time-consuming process, and you must do it correctly.  Your market research should ideally consist of both primary and secondary research.  Check out this guide by Hubspot, which I have found to be very comprehensive for this part.  Identify your strengths and weaknesses as an individual  Once you have identified a problem, and the solution based on market research and validation, you should then analyse your individual skills profile. Consider the following: These 3 steps should help you get started on developing an Innovator Founder visa business idea  Once you do develop your business idea, I would then advise you to obtain my feedback on your business idea. I will evaluate your Innovator Founder visa business idea within a reasonable timeframe and at a reasonable cost.  Remember, business ideas require “business expertise”. Therefore, it is important to seek the right guidance (which is where I will be able to help). Already have a business idea? Book an initial consultation with me for a thorough evaluation. About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme. Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (replaced by the Innovator Founder Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses, and mainly with obtaining endorsements from the endorsing bodies.

Business Immigration Services Breakdown | Working With Me

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Just over a year ago, I began providing business immigration services. It simply began as a side hustle and has now turned into my main business. The philosophy behind a business immigration consultancy was simple: I went through this journey myself.  As is the case with many businesses, at some point there is the need to adapt to expansion accordingly. My consultancy business was initially focused on business plan writing and consultations as a secondary service.  However, with growing demand and client base, my consultancy now covers every stage of the business planning process, from the idea stage to producing a viable business plan. Additionally, I now also offer services in relation to SEO, digital marketing and PR.  In this article, I will briefly outline the various stages of my business immigration services, and what clients may expect.  Stage 1: Initial Consultation | Cost: £50 The first stage of my business immigration services is an initial consultation, which can be booked here.  The purpose of this consultation is: Once we determine the aforestated, you can then decide which one of my business immigration services would be the most suitable for you.  If you decide to purchase any further services, the £50 fee of the initial consultation will be automatically deducted from your future purchase(s).  Stage 2: Service Discussion | Ongoing Calls Once you purchase any additional business immigration services, we will arrange a second call to explore how we can begin working together and set up a timeframe.  Currently, my business immigration services cover the following areas: Stage 3: Delivery  Once we set the timeframes and your project needs in stages 1 and 2, the final stage will be the project delivery.  The timeframe for this stage is subjective and depends on the services purchased. For instance, a business plan will take longer than a review of your business idea.  Need business immigration services? Then please get in touch with me today to find out how I can help you with your business immigration needs. About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs and all founders with their businesses, including their business plans.

5 elements of a good business plan

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Writing a good business plan can be a challenging task. In essence, business planning is the first major challenge an entrepreneur faces as it is a blueprint of their venture. In this article, I will outline 5 elements that make a good business plan. This is based on my own experience as a tech founder, consultant and writer.  Writing a good business plan goes beyond proposing a viable business proposition. It entails clear articulation, milestones, well-written content and a thorough blueprint of how your business will succeed.  There are plenty of articles that will refer to the basic and compulsory parts of a business plan such as SWOT analysis and regard them as factors contributing to a good business plan.  However, my aim in this article is to provide you with the correct mindset and approach to: With the aforementioned in mind, let’s highlight the 5 key elements of a good business plan. Inclusion of the key standard sections  Okay, so let’s briefly highlight an obvious part, which many entrepreneurs surprisingly fall short of.  Regardless of the purpose of your business plan and where you are, several key sections must be included in every business plan. These key sections are: Clear & realistic business vision Entrepreneurship and starting a business require vision. And it is fantastic to set high goals. Nevertheless, this is where many entrepreneurs make a mistake. And the mistake is that they “fly too high” and set goals and visions that are essentially unrealistic.  Your vision and anticipated goals should be realistic and based on market trends supported by research.  Clear business milestones  The ideal business plan is not a fancy document to impress your investors or other parties. It is the blueprint of your business as a commercial entity.  And what does a blueprint entail? Clear procedural steps with timelines and outcomes.  Moreover, this is not just related to one part of the business plan, for example, product development.  Each aspect of the business (plan) should be subjected to prior anticipation with clear input/output estimations, whether it is product, marketing, sales or anything else.  Objective market research and avoiding the “founder bias” As stated earlier, I will not highlight standard business plan sections.  However, this part is crucial and you notice that I have used the word “objective”. You may have a business proposal that does respond to a genuine market need. However, this is where what I call the “founder bias” kicks in.  The “founder bias” is when a founder only states market research that supports the notion that there is a need for their product and/or service. This eliminates the “objectivity” aspect.  Your plan must be supported by objective market research, and this is why a business consultant like me is useful.  By highlighting all the facets of the market, you demonstrate enhanced commercial awareness. Plus, it enables you to anticipate and prepare for unexpected market shifts and how to respond accordingly.  Money, money, money (the financials) Regardless of the type of project, the primary goal of a venture is making money. Even if you are starting a non-profit/charity, your finances matter the most.  This is one of the most neglected aspects of many business plans. You must anticipate and account for cash inflows and outflows of your business.  And I get it: this is perhaps among the most difficult aspects, and hence why it is often neglected. However, without a financial analysis that is subject to scrutiny, you are almost always doomed for failure. About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs and all founders with their businesses, including their business plans.

Innovator Founder Visa | Policy Analysis

Just over a month ago, I created a YouTube video exploring the policy flaws of the UK’s Innovator Founder visa. This article is essentially a reflection of the same video, highlighting three fundamental policy flaws surrounding the Innovator Founder visa requirements.  *Please note that this content is merely a reflection of my personal opinion and evaluation and does not constitute immigration advice in any shape or form. If you are seeking immigration advice, please refer to OISC to find a registered immigration advisor/solicitor.* According to the UK Government’s website, the Innovator Founder visa allows international entrepreneurs to set up businesses in the UK. Full details of the visa rules can be found HERE.  The purpose of this article, however, is not to outline the general information about this visa. I have written this blog post to: –Highlight the flaws that other founders may resonate with; –To draw the attention of policymakers towards the anticipated flaws of the Innovator Founder visa and how it may potentially harm the UK in the short and long term So, let’s explore the flaws of the Innovator Founder visa policy. The low number of Innovator Founder visa endorsing bodies  This is perhaps the major weakness of the Innovator Founder visa policy.  This is especially the case when one takes a comparative evaluation between this visa path and its predecessor, the Innovator visa.  There are currently 3 endorsing bodies overseeing all applications made under the Innovator Founder visa pathway. This excludes the Global Entrepreneurs Programme (GEP) which is administered by the Department for Business and Trade. The aforementioned is in contrast to over 20 endorsing bodies that had the authority to issue endorsements for the former Innovator visa. Moreover, the previous endorsing bodies included well-established and reputable accelerators such as Founders Factory. To summarise the key issues in relation to the number of endorsing bodies: High endorsement & visa fees  Another major issue which may discourage many prospective applicants is the high visa fees associated with this visa pathway.  Let’s look at the initial costs associated with the Innovator Founder visa (and these are for single applicants only): As you see, you are paying a minimum of £3000 to simply make an application under this visa pathway.  By setting such high fees, the UK Government has failed to consider the long-term economic contribution of international entrepreneurs to the UK.  Not applicable to all The Innovator Founder visa is likely to not be applicable to every single founder. And the manner in which this is evident is through the three key business idea requirements, which are: Whilst on the surface, the abovestated factors may seem appropriate, they are not practical in action.  For instance, the viability requirement may only be evident once a business actually begins trading. Yet, this visa is also aimed at entrepreneurs who wish to “set up” their business in the UK. Another instance where the lack of applicability of this visa path is reflected is the removal of the former Startup and Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur visas. These visa routes were specifically aimed at founders who were to set up their business in the UK. Personally, I underwent the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur route myself under the endorsement of Newcastle University.  Currently, the Innovator Founder visa is a mashup of all founders, from all backgrounds and regardless of their business nature/stage.  Final notes  Entrepreneurship is fundamentally unpredictable and involves a core element of risk. Combining this with stringent and unfeasible immigration requirements does not provide an optimal outcome for any stakeholder. Moreover, it will only serve to weaken the UK’s global position as an entrepreneurial hub.  I appreciate that policymakers ought to ensure that genuine and innovative migrants move to the UK. Nevertheless, policies should be drafted in such a manner that involves a thorough comprehension of entrepreneurship and also mitigates the risk between the government and international entrepreneurs.  Need help with the Innovator Founder visa? I am the UK’s #1 & leading business consultant for international entrepreneurs. Whilst I do not provide immigration advice, I am able to assist in multiple areas such as drafting your Innovator Founder visa business plan.  For a full overview of my services, please refer to my homepage here.  About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme (similar to the current Start-Up Visa). Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (replaced by the Innovator Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses, and mainly with obtaining endorsements from the endorsing bodies.

5 lessons that you learn when you immigrate to another country

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Deciding to immigrate to another country is life-changing. It will affect virtually every aspect of your life. I immigrated to the UK from Iran when I was only 17 years old, all alone. Today, over a decade later, I want to share 5 lessons that immigration taught me.  If you are considering immigrating to another country, chances are that you want to make a change in your life. That’s awesome; I have so much respect for anybody who takes active steps to improve their lives.  However, if this is your first time immigrating, which is the case with most people, you are probably unaware of the implications that this may have for your life.  As such, I wish to share 5 key lessons that I learned after I immigrated to the UK during my formative years.   1. Most people don’t care about you  This begins to hit you as you find yourself alone in your new “home”. I don’t mean that you will necessarily be lonely, I certainly wasn’t. For the most part, my years as an immigrant were the most social years of my life. I made so many friends and I actually cannot count the number of people that I met.  However, this does not mean that you can rely on others. You really are on your own, and your problems are unique to you.  Let me give you an example: many of my friends, and my close circle of friends in university were British. Despite our close friendship, they simply could not resonate with me or my “immigrant” problems such as worrying about staying in the UK after graduation.  This is a tough lesson, initially. Nevertheless, it is also a chance to build that “immigrant resilience” and self-sufficiency that helps you achieve greater things later in life.  2. And the above includes family members  Now, I do not wish to generalize here, as everyone’s family members are different. And by this, I am not necessarily referring to immediate family members such as parents.  However, when you do immigrate, you will face barriers and problems in your life. And guess what? Tough times show you who really cares, and who does not.  Do not be surprised if you notice that you have lost contact with family members whom you regarded as life companions.  It is a sad reality in the world that failure and hard times are also very lonely.  3. You may lose your identity after you immigrate  Once you settle in after you immigrate, and integrate, you may lose touch with who you really are.  You may begin to question your identity, your core values, your culture and so on.  This is not necessarily a bad thing. Having this “comparative” outlook broadens your mental horizon.  However, it can be a difficult issue to face. Moreover, I firmly believe that our “values” strongly affect how far we get in life. Questioning your values will help you understand what your life purpose really is, and isn’t.  4. Do not expect a red carpet to be laid down for you Let me be absolutely clear here, and I am sorry to be the bearer of bad news: immigrating, in many scenarios, means that you are socially subordinate. The logic is essentially that “you have immigrated to this country because it is somehow better than yours”. Thus, be ready for many people to misunderstand your culture and where you come from. 5. The only way to survive is becoming stronger and wiser  As I said, you are on your own. This is a fact of life, and it is reinstated even more once you become an “immigrant”.  You will face injustice, discrimination, and unfairness. Yes, it sucks. But that’s a reality.  My advice to you: do not fall into the victimhood mentality. Improve your physical and intellectual capabilities every single day.  When I came to the UK as a college student, I was a skinny teenager who could barely write a formal email. Today, I’m an athlete, and a leading business consultant and hold a master’s degree in law.  These are the lessons that I learnt after I immigrated to the UK. I hope these help you prepare for your journey and give you a realistic outlook of what to expect.  About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme (similar to the current Start-Up Visa). Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (replaced by the Innovator Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses, and mainly with obtaining endorsements from the endorsing bodies.

5 disadvantages of moving to the UK as an international entrepreneur or skilled migrant

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If you are an international entrepreneur or skilled migrant, and thinking of moving to the UK then you have likely considered the pros and cons of doing so. This article will highlight 5 disadvantages of moving to the UK as an international entrepreneur or skilled migrant.  I have recently made a YouTube video covering the topic of moving to the UK as an international entrepreneur or skilled migrant. So, if you’re a “video person” then feel free to browse this topic on my YouTube channel.  Nonetheless, let’s talk about moving to the UK as a founder or skilled employee. Most businesses operating in the immigration sector will overwhelm you with the advantages of considering the UK. And they are not necessarily wrong, there are plenty of advantages to moving to the UK.  However, my goal is to be as authentic as possible, and represent the interests of international entrepreneurs and skilled professionals migrating to the UK. As such, I deemed it beneficial to dedicate an entire blog article/video to the disadvantages of moving to the UK. This is in light of the current political, economic and social landscapes.  So, with that in mind, let’s look at the five disadvantages of moving to the UK on an Innovator Founder visa or as a skilled migrant.  The social life (or lack thereof)  As mentioned in the video, the UK’s culture is more reserved in contrast to many others around the world.  This is simply a fact that you must accept. Nor should you expect a host country to change its culture for you to adapt.  Nevertheless, my point here does not refer to the reserved nature of the UK’s social fabric. It refers to a sense of looming “dread” that has taken over the British Isles, especially after the 2020 Pandemic.  The majority of people in the UK, with the exception of students, prefer to simply go to work and sit at home and watch TV. Other than that, there’s the culture of binge drinking, which may not appeal to everybody.  This can also be partly blamed on the current cost of living crisis, as well as the rise of social media. The latter, in my opinion, has led to a decrease in people’s socialising skills and authenticity.  Therefore, if you come from a people-oriented society/culture, which is predominant in Eastern cultures, this can be an issue.  The UK’s polarised society  There is a major divide between different segments of the society within the UK. As explained in the YouTube video, the key dividing factor in the UK is socio-economic class. Regardless of being wealthy or not, you are somehow demonised by each class. The housing crisis Britain is facing a major housing crisis. I’m sure you can guess the outcome: you have to spend more for less.  The UK has a demand-supply deficit of over 4 million homes, according to a report by the Centre for Cities in 2023.  Hostility & micro-aggressions that drain your mental health This is a byproduct of several issues such as the current politico-economic climate. Notably, issues such as the refugee crisis and so on.  The purpose of this article is not to deconstruct these issues. I aim to paint a clearer picture of issues that international entrepreneurs and skilled migrants may face upon arrival in the UK.  The everyday micro-aggressions and general tension within the UK society will eventually be draining. Plus, they add to the many problems that come with being a skilled migrant. In my personal case, for instance, I substantially noticed this when using the NHS services, which I thought was quite unfair. Especially given that I was paying for it via the NHS Health Surcharge.  The immigration system Lastly, there is navigating the UK’s immigration system, which is constantly changing and subject to increased and strict scrutiny. Moreover, there is the issue of fee increases on a regular basis. This can really disadvantage certain migrants such as international entrepreneurs. Of course, this is not to argue that the immigration system should accommodate everybody. International founders and skilled migrants are investing their time, skills and money. Thus, this can become a negative factor.  These are the 5 disadvantages of moving to the UK as an international entrepreneur or skilled migrant.  If you are still considering moving to the UK, and need help, feel free to drop me a message.  This is particularly applicable to international founders considering the Innovator Founder visa and who need help with things such as their business plan.  About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats. I did so by obtaining an endorsement from Newcastle University under the Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur Scheme (similar to the current Start-Up Visa). Subsequently, I obtained a further 3-year Tier 1 Entrepreneur Visa (replaced by the Innovator Visa). I grew my business to over 30 UK cities, and a team of four, and also obtained my Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) in the UK. I now help other migrant entrepreneurs, such as myself, with their businesses, and mainly with obtaining endorsements from the endorsing bodies.

Innovator Founder Visa: Business Consultant vs. Business Plan Writer

If you are considering the Innovator Founder visa, you have probably come across the terms “business plan writer” and “business consultant”. Well, at least on my website/channels you have. So let’s look at the difference between a business plan writer and a business consultant. Understanding the difference will also help you decide which one may be useful to you.  Depending on your venture and personal skills, you may need the help of a business plan writer or business consultant for your Innovator Founder visa application.  First of all, I will do the “sales” part to inform you that I am both a business plan writer and a business consultant. Nevertheless, this is not usually the case, distinguishing me from any other service pertaining to Innovator Founder visa and international founders. In fact, I am the UK’s first and #1 business consultant for international founders. Moreover, I was an immigrant entrepreneur myself and settled in the UK via several business visas.  Okay, now let’s look at each in detail, followed by a comparison table at the end.  Business Plan Writer In the abstract, the function of a plan writer is perhaps quite clear. Business plan writers possess the knowledge and skills to produce a well-written and well-researched business plan However, the key point is that a business plan writer may not necessarily be familiar with running a business or have prior experience of doing so.  The key competencies of a business plan writer are: Business Consultant  Business consultants, in contrast to business plan writers, are essentially there to advise on your business concept/protocols. Thus, they may not necessarily engage in producing business plans. However, they help you understand what needs to go on your business plan and eventually your venture.  The core competencies of a business consultant are: Summary Business Consultant Business Plan Writer In-depth industry knowledge  Understanding of business plan standards  Experience in running and scaling a business  Language/writing skills Need help? I operate as both a consultant and plan writer Whether you need help with writing your business consultant or are seeking a consultant to advise on your operations, I am here to help.  Get in touch with me today to find out more. You may also watch a YouTube video that I have made on the same topic.  About | My name is Sohrab Vazir. I’m a UK-based entrepreneur and business consultant. At the age of 22, and while I was an international student (graduate), I started my own Property Technology (PropTech) business, StudyFlats which I scaled to over 30 UK cities. I currently help other entrepreneurs and businesses of all size with the digital marketing strategy around SEO, copywriting and content.

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